Biometrics can help identify careers: Manish Naidu,founder,Brainwonders

Can biometrics tell what is the right career for a candidate? Or even help make mid-career corrections so that it’s a win-win for companies and candidates. Mumbai based career counselling startup Brainwonders uses Taiwan’s DMIT (Dermatoglyphics Multiple Intelligence Test) software to arrive at what’s best for the candidates.

It uses fingerprint scans to generate a report which can give clues to abilities of candidates and what career might be best suited to their skills. In an interact with ET, Manish Naidu, founder, Brainwonders, explains the idea behind DMIT and expansion plans in India.

Can biometrics give an idea of future prospects of a student? How accurate is the methodology?

We use DMIT technology which is Dermatoglyphics Multiple Intelligence Test. Derma is the skin and glyphics are the regions on the skin. We use biometric scans to identify innate strengths, weakness, characteristics, left & right-brain dominance, which ultimately leads to the question of what next. What is my career choice?

How can you determine that with fingerprint scans?
Most of us are either pressurised to do something because of peer or parental pressure. In terms of career many people face this so called, mid-life crisis at the age of 30-35 years because by that time they would have done 3-4 jobs and perhaps realize that this was not their cup of tea. So, one opts for a career where your aptitude and interest both match up, that is the best career for you. Striking the right balance between passion and ability is important. We can help identify careers.

How does the process work?

We have a biometric scanner and candidates take a fingerprint test. We take biometric scans (all fingers) and then a 24-page report comes out.

Career is the end result. The data science is entirely based on your fingerprints. Fingerprints give you a lot of data points. Once we take the fingerprints there are ridge counts on it, through ridge count there is a nerve growth factor that happens. Through the nerve growth factor, DMIT (a non-invasive genetic test) will tell the details about how the person’s innate potential is and how over the generations it has kept on revising.

For example, earlier, if the whole family was into carpentering, children used to follow the same generation after generation because the innate potential of that particular generation used to get passed on to the next. But then every person has his own unique characteristics and that’s how they started deviating from their familiar core points. When the report comes in we talk to you about all the factors which will help you choose your career.

It sounds like palmistry. How credible can this be?

The idea is to tell candidates what is good for them. It’s up to them to decide what to do. Once the test is taken, that is the fingerprint scans have been submitted (a five-minute process) – we send it to the Well Gene Science Lab in Malaysia for an analysis and the report is generated in three days. Once we have the report, we have a team of 183 clinical and career psychologists who interpret the report for the students and other clients- complete with guidance and recommendations. This gives them a way ahead.

What happens when your test says that a certain person may be good at something but his/her interest is in something else?

This does happen because your interest in not based on your aptitude. Your interest depends on what is prejudicing you at that moment of time. Your interest can change time to time, so you will keep experimenting with your areas of likes and dislikes till the time you find the compatible aptitude to support it. So, what we tell you is to keep pursuing your interest(s) but also guide you that your intelligence is in this particular sector and the moment it matches up, is where your career will shoot up. So the interest level can keep on changing, once the changed interest level matches with your genetic intelligence level is when you get your actual match and get your success story.

How many institutions do you work with?
We work with 230 schools across the country. A few companies (their HR departments) have also shown interest. We are also in talks with NSDL.

Careers at High Risk for Substance Addiction

Most individuals will admit that their job can be stressful at times and create moments where they want to walk away and quit or possibly have more than they should to drink at an event. However, there are certain career fields that are more at risk to substance addiction (alcohol or drugs) because of the inherent nature of the positions. For these individuals it is critical to see the risk and have a way of dealing with the factors that put them in this category.

When determining ‘at risk’ industries, one of the first characteristics considered is the stress level. Police and emergency personnel immediately jump to the top of the list as they risk their lives every time they start a shift which can last anywhere from 8-12 hours. Over time this stress can become overwhelming in addition to the horrific things they see because of their work and coping with these situations becomes the #1 priority.

Often these individuals turn to substances that ‘numb’ the nerves just so they can stop the images or ‘forget’ for a time. Alcohol and drugs are the easiest to access and while it starts out small, the amount grows as the body needs more and more to achieve the level of euphoria that they are looking for. Another high-risk career field that most don’t expect to see on the list is teaching regardless of the level. While this would seem to be a fun-loving job, it too has a high amount of associated stress factors in dealing with kids all day, their issues and the pressures that come with having to meet standards at several levels. College students are also at risk not only because of the school/job expectations but also the peer pressure attached to fraternities/sororities and other cliques on campus.

The best alcohol treatment centers in NJ” understand the intricacies of each one of these scenarios and have put together custom programs to help individuals address their unique stress factors and how to deal with them. Outpatient treatment plans have proven effective for these high-risk patients where they spend the day in group and individual therapy learning techniques to handle the stress and being treated with medications to help wean off the substance. In the evening, they go home to their family and have the opportunity to apply what they have learned and deal with the situations in a familiar setting and then provide feedback to the counselor the next day. This balance allows these patients to mix in with their environment rather than being admitted for a month or more and then having to go through the adjustment process.

Addiction has no boundaries and doesn’t focus on just the individuals who work in high-stress jobs which is why it is so important to be vigilant so help can be gotten as soon as possible. Check out the alcohol treatment centers NJ and see how they can help you as a patient, provide support if you are family or get information so you know the signs to watch for in friends and family members. Stress cannot be avoided but it can be managed even in industries where it is part of the job.

Pharmaceutical Waste Management: Practices and Challenges in Burmeso, Indonesia

Pharmaceutical waste management is a critical issue globally, especially in developing countries like Indonesia, where rapid urbanization and industrial growth can strain existing waste management infrastructures. Burmeso, a region in Indonesia, faces unique challenges and employs specific practices in managing pharmaceutical waste.

 

Current Practices

In Burmeso, pharmaceutical waste management primarily revolves around disposal practices at healthcare facilities such as hospitals, clinics, and pharmacies. Often, these facilities segregate pharmaceutical waste into categories like hazardous and non-hazardous before disposal. Non-hazardous waste typically includes expired medications and packaging materials, while hazardous waste comprises items contaminated with cytotoxic drugs or infectious materials.

 

The disposal methods commonly used include landfilling and incineration. Landfilling is a straightforward but potentially hazardous method due to leaching of chemicals into soil and groundwater. Incineration, though effective in reducing waste volume, raises concerns about air pollution and requires sophisticated technology to manage emissions safely.

 

Challenges

Burmeso faces several challenges in effectively managing pharmaceutical waste:

 

Lack of Awareness and Education: Many healthcare professionals and the general public are unaware of proper disposal methods and the risks associated with improper handling of pharmaceutical waste.

 

Infrastructure Deficiencies: Limited resources and infrastructure for waste management pose significant challenges. Rural areas often lack proper facilities for safe disposal.

 

Regulatory and Enforcement Issues: Inconsistent enforcement of regulations and inadequate monitoring exacerbate the problem. Compliance with waste management regulations is often low due to a lack of oversight.

 

Environmental Impact: Improper disposal methods can lead to environmental degradation, affecting soil, water, and air quality. Pharmaceutical residues in water bodies can harm aquatic ecosystems and human health.

 

Health Risks: Exposure to pharmaceutical waste poses health risks to waste handlers, healthcare workers, and the community at large, especially in the absence of proper protective measures.

 

Mitigation Strategies

Addressing these challenges requires a multi-faceted approach:

 

Education and Training: Increase awareness among healthcare professionals and the public about proper pharmaceutical waste management practices.

 

Infrastructure Development: Invest in waste management infrastructure, particularly in rural areas, to ensure safe disposal and minimize environmental impact.

 

Regulatory Strengthening: Strengthen enforcement of existing regulations and develop new guidelines where necessary to improve compliance and monitoring.

 

Technological Innovation: Explore safer disposal technologies such as advanced incineration methods or pharmaceutical waste treatment plants.

 

Community Engagement: Involve local communities in waste management initiatives to foster a sense of responsibility and sustainability.

 

Conclusion

Pafiburmeso faces significant challenges stemming from inadequate infrastructure, awareness, and regulatory enforcement. Addressing these issues requires concerted efforts from government agencies, healthcare providers, and the community to implement effective waste management practices and mitigate environmental and health risks associated with improper disposal. By adopting comprehensive strategies and fostering collaboration, Burmeso can move towards sustainable pharmaceutical waste management practices beneficial for both public health and the environment.